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Two suffer minor injuries in T car accident, official says

BOSTON – The driver of a MBTA vehicle and another motorist sustained minor injuries tonight after the T car was rear-ended near the Ruggles stop just before 6 p.m., a Transit spokesman said.

Joe Pesaturo, a T spokesman, said in an e-mail that the driver of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority car and the driver of the other vehicle were treated and released at area hospitals after a “minor accident,” which is under investigation.

At the scene near the corner of Leon and Ruggles streets tonight, the badly damaged MBTA The Ride car was seen pressed up against the side of a Northeastern University dormitory, which had a small crack in the area of impact. A Northeastern spokeswoman said in an e-mail that no one was seriously injured and city inspectors have determined that the building is safe.

The other vehicle, a compact Toyota with severe front-end damage, was being loaded onto a flat-bed truck. Pesaturo said traffic was rerouted around the scene for about 90 minutes.

Shakea Sturdivant, 18, lives across the street from the scene of the accident and said she heard a loud bang before rushing to the aid of the driver of the Toyota, a woman who appeared to be in her 20s.

Sturdivant said she helped the woman pull herself out of the car, and that she was crying and “went into shock.”

“She said she couldn’t feel her knees,” Sturdivant said. “She was feeling cold.”

Sturdivant said a nurse approached them and tried to render first aid to the woman while they waited for an ambulance. She said she did not see any cuts, blood, or bruising on the woman.

Sturdivant’s neighbor, Charles Burke, 40, said he also heard a bang and then watched from his window as the MBTA car crashed into the dorm. He said paramedics pulled the driver out of the car, laid him on the ground, and then placed him in a stretcher before putting him in an ambulance. He said paramedics did the same for the injured woman.

Burke said accidents are common at the intersection, because the traffic lights stay red for a long time and people often run yellow lights to keep moving. “This happens here often,” he said.

Source:   boston.com